LOST AND FOUND IN THE RONAWAVE

LOST AND FOUND IN THE RONAWAVE

3 women 3 friends

JUDY FISKIN, FIONA CONNOR, ROSANNA ALBERTINI

JUDY FISKIN, More Art 1992-95, Plate 277

On Apr 4, 2020, at 3:06 PM, Judy Fiskin wrote:  Thank you again for sharing your uncle with us.  The photographs are surprising—so lush and filled with sculpture that we never see in our cemeteries.  I wish him more, too.  And all of us.  Judy

JUDY FISKIN, More Art 1992-1995, Plate 270

On Apr 4, 2020, at 6:40 PM, Rosanna Albertini wrote:  You got exactly the reason I put so many of them. The photographs. The rest was to make him happy, which worked, and for me counts more than making readers content.

JUDY FISKIN, More Art 1992-1995, Plate 272

Accidenti I miss you, today. I don’t know why I am depressed. Maybe it was time. A deflated balloon. Small attack of cleanliness: this time my desk with annessi e connessi: wires, boxes, books, a broken sculpture of marble that I had never seriously cleaned in 30 years.  Le Carré’s most recent book is beautiful and exasperating. I move to Jabès. Also exhausting, but linguistically more interesting. I can steal some expressions that make me think. Yesterday all my commitment was to a yogurt blueberries tart, authentically American recipe, Fanny Farmer’s. Maybe the name is misspelled. I try to update my art history info on line, listen to Analia Saban – I knew her when she was nobody –  now she sounds like a princess sitting on a printed pillow. She had one eye escaping the center, surgery corrected it. She discovered that computer circuits and the first computer patterns were the same as the texture of any piece of fabric. So now she prints and puts on the wall in various elegant variations the computer circuit patterns. I understand her, I fell in love with a couple of them a while ago, visually I mean, yet it doesn’t seem to me a great idea, etcetera, which is now art history. I wanted to transform my circuits in white embroidery on white canvas. Peter is throwing something away into the garbage bin. I don’t want to see what. Surprisingly, he is cleaning his office and the pre-office and the computer. Sacred space, I stay in mine. A French artist friend sent me an e-mail this morning, I started to speak to the gardeners in French. I was ashamed of myself, so much out of control. Is our brain really ours? What are you doing? And Jon? 

JUDY FISKIN, More Art 1992-1995, Plate 284

We had two night of heavy noise in the attic. Rats are back! — we thought. Maybe. We tried to pass the message to cat Carlos. He looked lazy. Still disturbed by the replacement cat door (corrected ‘candor’ by Mister Comp) Peter installed in the kitchen door. Too shiny. Complaining, he goes through. The last two nights, the noise stopped and Carlos up and down on the fence like a sentinel. Maybe the rat met him and got scared? We will never know. RA

On April 7, 2020, at 6.45 PM, Rosanna Albertini wrote:  Dear Judy, they call it ronawave in South Los Angeles, did you know it? I like it only one word, pinnacles away: mine, appropriated. Images of the ronawave look so much like regal crowns, we don’t need royalty. Yesterday I had black clouds in my mind. Couldn’t do anything. Maybe I read too much, all the possible mystery books I could find, from Camilleri to Le Carré. Same with the TV series; Peter and I got lost in BroadChurch and Hinterland, beautifully done, so that sadness prevails on horror and homicides. Still a human land. But in the end the dead were the only focus, and I ended up sharing with Alberto, and spreading through the blog, images of cemeteries. That was a memory trip. Maybe I never told you I bear the name of a stillborn girl, my grandmother’s only female child. “You are my girl” she used to tell me. Still it isn’t clear to me if she meant I was hers, possessively, or I was that girl reborn. Never found her grave, and I was going to the cemetery every Sunday morning, to bring fresh flowers and clean the vases.  Back to now, I only wanted to cry. 

JUDY FISKIN, More Art 1992-1995, Plate 275

Jabès again. I tried a full immersion in his pages. Very few each time. They brought me up, made me think again. “Safety is to restart, he says. Infinity, eternity are enemies of the pulp and of the peel,” if you are an orange. I had to restart my disciplined habit of wearing the mood of each day. No news for instance, for me it doesn’t work. Paper in the morning, and Brian Williams in the evening. We can’t escape. Jabès really kicked me with this: “We never know where we are and where we are not, so much the world is confused into us.”  Cat Carlos seems to follow the trend of these days. Needs company, and releases long feline talks, modulated, from 7 to 8 in the morning, forcing us to get up. Silence in the attic, no rat.  

I keep thinking about not knowing where I am and where I am not, and the sense of disoriented life in these days of isolation. Venice Boulevard is the same and it is not, with shops and restaurants closed, no traffic, people skipping away from each other as if we were absent walkers. For you I am not, don’t worry. Shall I touch the button of the traffic light? Why do I hesitate? But really Judy, confusion is us all the time. Walls and places get into our organs. Our inner music is different. When I was in Pisa, wrapped by century old walls and narrow streets, I was not the same person who walks on Grand View captured by the sky, the light. The ronawave can kill me or not. The coordinates of my daily life will be different for a while. So far, the air is clean and breathing is a pleasure. That’s enough. I hope your day was pleasant, RA

  FIONA CONNOR FROM NEW ZEALAND

On Apr 7, 2020, at 3:51 PM, Fiona Connor  wrote:  Dear Rosanna, Nice to get your messages here. This sounds nice.  Yes I like the series of images as they were.  Even if it is hard to see the drawing. The documentation seems nicely bound in time. Look forward to seeing Judy’s pieces and what you put together.
DRAWING AT THE BEACH